The rain in Spain results in adjusting my sails

"She stood in the storm, and when the wind did not blow her way, she adjusted her sails." Elizabeth Edwards.

on the spot watercolour sketch in hotel lounge

Not long after we arrived in Spain, we had two days of bad weather. All four of us accepted that there would be no long walks on the Paseo Maritimo in Torremolinos, no exploring other than to find new restaurants for our meals. The intense rain and wind put a stop to our sightseeing plans.

The rain and wind abated around lunch time and we ran across the road to La Cabaña for paella and sangria, and then took a few photos of the rough waves before heading back to the lounge.

Because we were still jet lagged, we were grateful for the imposed change of pace.

on the spot - watercolour sketches - in the lounge
on the spot sketch - at the bar

While others passed the time reading, or playing games on their tablets, I practised quick, surreptitious sketches.

People came and went at the bar or in the lounge. Everyone was seeking a meeting place out of the rain.

I had many different scenarios to choose from. Some hotel guests were texting, others were chatting with family and friends, some sleeping... and generally, people didn't move too much so I was able to rapidly sketch their positions on paper and then add touches of watercolour on the spot.

The hours passed surprisingly quickly, and soon, the sun returned.

journal page - Malaga
Picasso journal page in travel sketchbook

Even before leaving Canada, I had convinced myself that I would have time to sit and sketch.

To that end, I carefully selected pens, pencils and travel watercolour set. I worried about the extra weight the contents of the zippered pouch would add to my carry-on bag so in the days before our trip, I sorted, and reorganized that container many times.

I needn't have worried.

Except for those two days of rain, daily sketching didn't happen. In fact, the Malaga pages were completed once I returned home.

We were on the go and when, at the end of the day, very late at night, we found ourselves back in our rooms, I was just too tired to even think about sketching and painting. It was time to socialize!

I adjusted my sails.

Picasso journal page 2
quick sketches scenes from Malaga courtyards

What my travel sketches will not reveal about me

"You can't do sketches enough. Sketch everything and keep your curiosity fresh." ~ John Singer Sargent.

watercolour and ink sketch of clothes for travelling
watercolour and gouache map of trip in travel sketchbook

As you read this, I will be basking in the warm sun on the Costa del Sol. With all the rain we have had here lately, sunshine will be a pleasant change for us.

My sketchbook and a few art supplies are ready to be packed.

Here are five things you will not find out about me in my sketchbooks:

1. I have a healthy fear of flying but I fight it because I want to see the world. There is so much more to fear these days it seems: being bumped off planes, or more specifically, dragged off and missing my entire holidays as I heal a concussion from the overly zealous militia-like officials. We know from the nightly news that this is not a far-fetched possibility anymore. I fear passenger rage as we are crammed tightly into small spaces. I fear turbulence and any kind of unexpected bump in the night.

2. Speaking of night, contrary to all my friends, I cannot and have never been able to sleep on a plane. As I make one of several trips to the washroom, I see that I am the only one awake along with the air attendants. How I envy all those people who are snoring with their mouths open, the drool running down their chins.

3. I will probably never visit some countries because they are just too far. Recently, we inquired about a trip to Vietnam and our travel agent told us we could travel over the north pole and we would be seeing not one but two sunrises. She seemed excited about that but that was a turnoff for me. Ten hours is the most I can stand confined to a metal tube hurtling through the atmosphere at 30,000 feet above the earth.

4. My friends Sally and Jill who live in different areas of Australia will probably never see unless they meet me half way. Hawaii is a nice place to visit and I might be able to handle that with a stopover on the west coast. Sally and I have been friends now for five or so years and have never met in person whereas I met Jill on our Scenic cruise last fall.

5. For some odd reason, I am not as nervous on the flight back home. I can't explain why that is, it just is. I am always happy to be back even when we have had the most wonderful time.

I will post any sketches I manage to complete while we are in Spain when I return home.

Cheers everyone!

Spain will once more add pages to my travel book

"The world is a book and those who do not travel read only one page." ~St. Augustine.

first page in sketchbook for trip to Spain

In a few weeks we will be enjoying, along with our lifelong friends, a glass or two of sangria on the shores of the Mediterranean.

This will be our second visit to Spain's Costa del Sol. Our first trip was in 2014 and we stayed in Marbella for a few nights and travelled to Mijas and Torremolinos but those visits were far too brief.

Spain kept a piece of me...I had to return.

This time, I am bringing along a travel journal, a sketchbook where I want to record our daily activities and add drawings as I did when we were in Havana, Cuba, in June 2016.

Parque Central sketch - in the lobby (Havana, June 2016)

Last fall, I regretted not having my watercolours and other paraphernalia with me on our Rhine/Danube cruise. However, if truth be told, I probably would not have had time to sit and sketch. This will not be the case in Torremolinos.

You might wonder what is so special about a travel journal?

Contrary to photos, a travel journal makes you more aware of all the minute details of your surroundings. You might record:

- snippets of overheard conversation
- stamps from different areas
- maps or sections of maps
- quick, on-the-go, gestural type sketches
- more leisurely, detailed sketches
- quotations
- lists (sites to see, things to do in and around the area)
- bits and pieces of travel brochures
- the joys of discoveries, the disappointments and irritations that sometimes occur while travelling
- the best gelatos, tapas, beer, wine, etc. that you enjoyed and where you found them
- caricatures of people

In a world of instant this and that, a travel journal seems old-fashioned and maybe even quaint to some people.

But putting pen to paper forces the writer/artist to examine the surroundings without any filters of a camera lens and find the particular in the general setting, as well as people to sketch, and conversations to listen to (eavesdropping is permitted at such times), and chronicle the highlights of the trip.

More often than not, as I am sketching, someone will look over my shoulder and begin questioning me, and that will lead to more fascinating discoveries.

A travel journal/sketchbook, I would argue, heightens the senses.

The world is a book and those who do not read each page thoughtfully, savouring each word, will easily forget the wonders they have seen.

You can quote me on that!